They OWE us BIG??

Medical malpractice: What does it involve?

Last updated Wed 5 Apr 2017
Medical malpractice occurs when a health care professional or provider neglects to provide appropriate treatment, omits to take an appropriate action, or gives substandard treatment that causes harm, injury, or death to a patient.

The malpractice or negligence normally involves a medical error. This could be in diagnosis, medication dosage, health management, treatment, or aftercare.

Medical malpractice law makes it possible for patients to recover compensation from any harms that result from sub-standard treatment.

According to the Medical Malpractice Center, in the United States, there are between 15,000 and 19,000 medical malpractice suits against doctors every year.

The standards and regulations for medical malpractice can differ between countries and states. Read MORE...

The STRESS & ANXIETY that's caused by ignorance is REAL!!

Anxiety and physical illness

Understanding and treating anxiety can often improve the outcome of chronic disease.

With headlines warning us of international terrorism, global warming, and economic uncertainty, we're all likely to be a little more anxious these days. As an everyday emotion, anxiety — the "fight or flight" response — can be a good thing, prompting us to take extra precautions. But when anxiety persists in the absence of a need to fight or flee, it can not only interfere with our daily lives but also undermine our physical health. Evidence suggests that people with anxiety disorders are at greater risk for developing a number of chronic medical conditions. They may also have more severe symptoms and a greater risk of death when they become ill.

The anatomy of anxiety

Anxiety is a reaction to stress that has both psychological and physical features. The feeling is thought to arise in the amygdala, a brain region that governs many intense emotional responses. As neurotransmitters carry the impulse to the sympathetic nervous system, heart and breathing rates increase, muscles tense, and blood flow is diverted from the abdominal organs to the brain. In the short term, anxiety prepares us to confront a crisis by putting the body on alert. But its physical effects can be counterproductive, causing light-headedness, nausea, diarrhea, and frequent urination. And when it persists, anxiety can take a toll on our mental and physical health.

Anxiety as illness

Research on the physiology of anxiety-related illness is still young, but there's growing evidence of mutual influence between emotions and physical functioning. Yet anxiety often goes unidentified as a source of other disorders, such as substance abuse or physical addiction, that can result from attempts to quell feelings of anxiety. And it's often overlooked in the myriad symptoms of chronic conditions like irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or migraine headache.

Nearly two-thirds of the estimated 40 million adults with anxiety disorders are women. What people with these disorders have in common is unwarranted fear or distress that interferes with daily life (see chart). Anxiety also plays a role in somatic symptom disorder, which is characterized by physical symptoms such as pain, nausea, weakness, or dizziness that have no apparent physical cause.

Anxiety has been implicated in several chronic physical illnesses, including heart disease, chronic respiratory disorders, and gastrointestinal conditions. When people with these disorders have untreated anxiety, the disease itself is more difficult to treat, their physical symptoms often become worse, and in some cases they die sooner.

Anxiety disorders and their symptoms

Disorder

Symptoms

Generalized anxiety disorder

Exaggerated worry about health, safety, money, and other aspects of daily life that lasts six months or more. Often accompanied by muscle pain, fatigue, headaches, nausea, breathlessness, and insomnia.

Phobias

Irrational fear of specific things or situations, such as spiders (arachnophobia), being in crowds (agoraphobia), or being in enclosed spaces (claustrophobia).

Social anxiety disorder (social phobia)

Overwhelming self-consciousness in ordinary social encounters, heightened by a sense of being watched and judged by others and a fear of embarrassment.

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

Reliving an intense physical or emotional threat or injury (for example, childhood abuse, combat, or an earthquake) in vivid dreams, flashbacks, or tormented memories. Other symptoms include difficulty sleeping or concentrating, angry outbursts, emotional withdrawal, and a heightened startle response.

Obsessive/compulsive disorder (OCD)

Obsessive thoughts, such as an irrational fear of contamination, accompanied by compulsive acts, such as repetitive hand washing, that are undertaken to alleviate the anxiety generated by the thoughts.

Panic disorder

Recurrent episodes of unprovoked feelings of terror or impending doom, accompanied by rapid heartbeat, sweating, dizziness, or weakness.

Anxiety and gastrointestinal disorders

About 10% to 20% of Americans suffer from the two most common functional digestive disorders — IBS and functional dyspepsia (upset stomach). In these disorders, the nerves regulating digestion appear to be hypersensitive to stimulation. Because these conditions don't produce lesions like ulcers or tumors, they aren't considered life-threatening. But their symptoms — abdominal pain, bloating, and diarrhea or constipation in IBS; and pain, nausea, and vomiting in functional dyspepsia — can be chronic and difficult to tolerate.

There are no firm data on the prevalence of anxiety disorders in people with functional digestive disorders, but a 2007 New Zealand study of subjects with gastroenteritis (inflammation of the digestive tract) found an association between high anxiety levels and the development of IBS following a bowel infection.

Chronic respiratory disorders

In asthma, inflamed airways constrict spasmodically, reducing the flow of air through the lungs. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), inflammation of the airways is exacerbated by a loss of elasticity in the lungs: not only is it more difficult for air to reach the lungs, but the lungs neither fill nor expel air completely.

Although results vary, most studies have found a high rate of anxiety symptoms and panic attacks in patients who have chronic respiratory disease, with women at greater risk than men. In several studies involving COPD patients, anxiety has been associated with more frequent hospitalization and with more severe distress at every level of lung function. So even if anxiety doesn't affect the progress of the disease, it takes a substantial toll on quality of life.

Anxiety and heart disease

Anxiety disorders have also been linked to the development of heart disease and to coronary events in people who already have heart disease. In the Nurses' Health Study, women with the highest levels of phobic anxiety were 59% more likely to have a heart attack, and 31% more likely to die from one, than women with the lowest anxiety levels. Data from 3,300 postmenopausal women in the Women's Health Initiative showed that a history of full-blown panic attacks tripled the risk of a coronary event or stroke.

Two studies — one involving Harvard Medical School and the Lown Cardiovascular Research Institute; the other, several Canadian medical colleges — concluded that among both men and women with established heart disease, those suffering from an anxiety disorder were twice as likely to have a heart attack as those with no history of anxiety disorders.

Physical benefits of treating anxiety

Therapies that have been successful in treating anxiety disorders can ease the symptoms of chronic gastrointestinal and respiratory diseases. These therapies may have an important role in preventing and treating heart disease. These are the best-studied approaches:

Cognitive-behavioral therapy. The cognitive component helps people identify and avoid thoughts that generate anxiety, and the behavioral part helps them learn how to react differently to anxiety-provoking situations. The specifics of the treatment depend on the type of anxiety. For example, patients with generalized anxiety disorder or panic disorder may be asked to examine their lives for habits and patterns that foster a sense of dread. They may also be taught relaxation techniques to diminish anxiety. Patients with OCD characterized by excessive washing may be asked to dirty their hands and wait with a therapist for increasingly longer intervals before cleaning up.

Psychodynamic psychotherapy. Anxiety is often triggered by a deep-seated emotional conflict or a traumatic experience that can sometimes be explored and resolved through psychotherapy. In the first randomized controlled clinical trial comparing relaxation therapy to psychodynamic psychotherapy (focused talk therapy), clinician-researchers at Columbia University in New York found that panic-disorder patients treated with psychodynamic therapy had significantly fewer symptoms and functioned better socially than those who underwent relaxation therapy. Nearly three-quarters of the psychotherapy group responded to treatment compared with only 39% of the relaxation-therapy group.

Drug therapy

Medications alone are less effective than psychotherapy over the long term. They may also have unpleasant side effects and interact with other medications. Still, they can be helpful when used in combination with psychotherapy. The most commonly used types of drugs include these:

Anti-anxiety drugs. Benzodiazepines — clonazepam (Klonopin) and alprazolam (Xanax) — were developed to relieve anxiety. They act rapidly and have few side effects except occasional drowsiness. But they're not recommended for long-term use, because patients develop tolerance and require increasing doses. Buspirone (BuSpar) may be a preferred drug. It needs two weeks to take full effect but can be taken for longer periods than benzodiazepines.

Antidepressants. Antidepressants, especially selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as sertraline (Zoloft), have been replacing benzodiazepines in the long-term treatment of panic disorder and generalized anxiety. Antidepressants have the advantage of relieving depression as well as anxiety, and they are believed to create less risk of dependence and abuse.

Beta blockers. These drugs can help relieve the symptoms of acute anxiety by slowing the heart rate and reducing blood pressure. They are often used, for example, to treat stage fright.

Seeking help

About 30% of people with anxiety disorders go through life untreated. If you think you might fall into this category — or if you have IBS, asthma, COPD, or heart disease and haven't been evaluated for anxiety — discuss it with your primary care clinician. Also be open to considering anxiety as the root cause if you have unexplained physical symptoms. Keep in mind that all symptoms are real — and treatable — whether they originate in the body or the brain.

 

Nurses getting caught STEALING OUR MED and they get a slap on the wrist?

This page checks the ignorance at the door! We don't have time for it! We don't want to hear it! You are not messing up my positive Vibe with your negativity and ignorance so you will get red quickly! Not just any old reading though we will teach and read all in one!

Do you believe we will have a REAL CURE in our lifetime? REAL CURE to me means a cure for ALL with no exemptions.

I CAN'T HELP THAT I HAVE NO IMMUNE SYSTEM!

**SCD AND IMMUNE SYSTEMS**
OUR IMMUNE SYSTEMS SUCK ON HOW MANY LEVELS? IDK...ALL I KNOW IS THAT AS A PARENT IT IS HARD TO CARE FOR YOUR KIDS{GERM MAGNETS} AND STAY OUT OF OUR SECOND HOME. WE HAVE TO HAVE LYSOL AND BLEACH ON HAND ALWAYS BECAUSE EVERYTHING WILL START A CRISIS AND THEN IT STEAMROLLS INTO I.C.U. STAYS...{{OUR SCD TRUTH}} I DARE ANYONE TO QUESTION THE KIND OF PARENT I AM...I HAD TO GET HELP FROM FAMILY SO THEY WOULD NOT BE WITHOUT TOO MUCH OF {THE NORM}...THIS IS {{SCD LIFE}} WE CAN'T COMPARE OUR LIVES WITH OTHER'S B/C IT WON'T BE FAIR. OUR LIFE INCLUDES TOO MANY EXTRA VARIABLES THAT IT WON'T BE EQUAL . {{DO NOT FEEL ASHAMED B/C OF YOUR SCD}} {GOD GIVEN GIFT}

LASHAWN HUTCHINSON

Yes...love dem #BOONDOCKS! Can you tell that I tried that yellow (jaundice) the eyes a bit?

#AMEN!!!! #love

Yall...I think the pharmacist believe that they know BETTER than the doctors! I got tried a few days ago.. HAD THE AUDACITY TO SAY.. WE DO NOT FILL SCRIPTS FROM DOWNTOWN ATLANTA!! Let that marinate....YEA!

To ask me or anyone that is living this SCDLIFE is truly a journey within itself because it is not that simple. I can give you this post and then YOU GO FROM THERE.

The realest thing I've ever ever posted!!!!
Like I've said before...if they only knew! It's a constant turning wheel of events. We get sick/ we get treated and then we try to recover. Everyone thinks that recovering is a piece of cake but I beg to differ. Recovering and recouping can be just as hard as the illness is itself so now you know.

YES I KNOW THAT THIS ISN'T A HOTEL!

Top 10 Reasons I Know I am in a
Hospital and Not a Hotel
by WEGO HealthThe below post is from Gastroparesis Health Activist,
Melissa’s, blog.

Top 10 Reasons I Know I am in a Hospital and Not a Hote

Top 10 Reasons I Know I am in a Hospitl and Not a Hotel

10. I hear beeps, intercom messages, and “code”
announcements every 10 seconds.

9. Five different nurses just tried 5 times each to start
an IV in my already sore arm.

8. I am confined to my assigned floor and can only
walk a small square of hallways while pulling my IV
pole alongside me.

7. I am drinking Protein Ensure rather than eating a 5-star meal.

6. Instead of a sun hat, I have a “hat” which measures
my urine output every time I use the restroom.

5. My clothing has no back side.

4. “Room service” personnel do not come quickly
when I call, and when they do arrive, they do not seem
to understand the basic rules of customer satisfaction.

3. An aide turned on the overhead and bed lights
without warning at 3:00 AM so that she could take my
blood pressure for about the hundredth time today –and then told me I should really get some sleep.

2. Someone just stuck a rather unpleasant tube down

my nose to pump my stomach.

1. I am paying far more for my stay here than I would

in even the finest hotel.



Dedicated to my Sickle Parents

This is the Dedication to my Sickle Parents: My whole intention of starting the private/secret group on Facebook was the feedback that I was getting on my I Testify: A Sickle CELL Story. These kids NEVER posted on the timeline but it never failed...LETTERS KEPT COMING. I don't feel comfortable speaking to them without the parents consent so that's why I did it PRIVATE for them to maybe start there to make it comfortable enough to not have to come to me unless they need a third party input. That's what I AIMED for but geez these kids... Any ideas?

WHEN DID YOU NOTICE THAT YOU WERE DIFFERENT?

SOLDIERS: What age did you begin feeling that you were different? Did you ask your parents about this?
PARENTS:
What age did your kids start asking questions about SC?

Usually I receive comments from nurses and Drs by DM and email. I post their questions if they want me to but when you post on my timeline about this subject of MISTREATMENT THAT IS NOT A LAUGHING MATTER TO ME THEN...
I blurred the name but I don't even think she understood how poignant her comment was to my post. IT DEPENDS WHO THE PATIENT IS THAT'S CALLING FOR YOUR HELP...AM I IN THE TWILIGHT ZONE?

WE NEED A GLOBAL ROUNDTABLE...FAST! YOU GUYS CAN'T EVEN IMAGINE WHAT I HAVE READ FROM NURSES THESE PAST 24 HRS...YES REAL NURSES! I WILL SHARE IT ALLLLL...

SICKLE CELL AND DEPRESSION

Apr. 14, 2015

GETTING OUT OF YOUR FUNK

I AM GOING TO ADMIT THAT DEPRESSION IS VERY REAL IN THIS COMMUNITY. WE HAVE TO DEAL WITH SO MUCH AND THAT IS NOT EVEN INCLUDING BASIC EVERYDAY DRAMA. HOW DO YOU COPE?

WWW.SHAWNSTESTIMONY.COM

HELPPPPPPP!!

THIS IS THE PLACE WHERE YOU COME IF YOU NEED AN HONEST OPINION. TBH...WHO MORE REAL THAN TEAMSCD? 

HELPPPPPPP!!

THIS IS WHERE YOU COME IF YOU NEED AN HONEST OPINION. ..