These Sickled Cells

The Hippocratic oath

Cartilage Damage in the WHOLE BODY 2

What is Sickle Cell?

THE TRUTH ABOUT SICKLE CELL AND IT'S DAMAGE.

PAINFUL CARTILAGE DAMAGE PREVENTION.

What is Sickle Cell?

CARTILAGE DAMAGE IN THE RIBCAGE

Sickle Cell and Brain Damage

Sickle Cell and Pulmonary Hypertension

What is Sickle Cell?

Sickle Cell Complications

What is Sickle Cell?

HOW MANY OF YOU HAVE EYE PROBLEMS?

Cartilage Damage in the WHOLE BODY!

SICKLE CELL AND YOUR EYES

YES...SICKLE CELL EFFECTS THE EYES AS WELL

Severe Anemia People with SCD usually have mild to moderate anemia. At times, however, they can have severe anemia. Severe anemia can be life threatening. Severe anemia in an infant or child with SCD may be caused by: Splenic sequestration crisis. The spleen is an organ that is located in the upper left side of the belly. The spleen filters germs in the blood, breaks up blood cells, and makes a kind of white blood cell. A splenic sequestration crisis occurs when red blood cells get stuck in the spleen, making it enlarge quickly. Since the red blood cells are trapped in the spleen, there are fewer cells to circulate in the blood. This causes severe anemia. A big spleen may also cause pain in the left side of the belly. A parent can usually palpate or feel the enlarged spleen in the belly of his or her child. Aplastic crisis. This crisis is usually caused by a parvovirus B19 infection, also called fifth disease or slapped cheek syndrome. Parvovirus B19 is a very common infection, but in SCD it can cause the bone marrow to stop producing new red cells for a while, leading to severe anemia. Splenic sequestration crisis and aplastic crisis most commonly occur in infants and children with SCD. Adults with SCD may also experience episodes of severe anemia, but these usually have other causes. No matter the cause, severe anemia may lead to symptoms that include: Shortness of breath Being very tired Feeling dizzy Having pale skin Babies and infants with severe anemia may feed poorly and seem very sluggish.

What Are the Types of
Sickle Cell Disease?

Hemoglobin is the protein in RBCs that
carries oxygen. It is made up of two alpha
chains and two beta chains. These are
made by the alpha and beta genes. The
four main types of sickle cell anemia are
caused by different mutations in these
genes.

Hemoglobin SS Disease

Hemoglobin SS disease is the most
common type of sickle cell disease. It
occurs when you inherit copies of the
hemoglobin S gene from both parents.
This forms hemoglobin known as Hb SS.

Hemoglobin SC Disease

Hemoglobin SC disease is the second
most common type of sickle cell disease.
It occurs when you inherit the Hb C gene
from one parent and the Hb S gene from
the other. Individuals with Hb SC have
similar symptoms to individuals with Hb
SS. However, the anemia is less severe.

Hemoglobin SB+ (Beta) Thalassemia

Hemoglobin SB+ (Beta) thalassemia
affects beta globin gene production. The
size of the red blood cell is reduced
because less beta protein is made. If
inherited with the Hb S gene, you will
have Hemoglobin S Beta thalassemia.

Beta-Zero Thalassemia

Beta-Zero thalassemia is the second type
of beta thalassemia. It has similar
symptoms to Hb SS anemia. However,
sometimes the symptoms of beta-zero
thalassemia are more severe. It is
associated with a poorer prognosis.

People who only inherit a mutated gene
from only one parent are said to have
sickle cell trait. They may have no
symptoms or reduced symptoms.